The Future of Microservices and the Internet of Things

Future of Microservices and the Internet of Things

Microservices are very dynamic, and the platform has seen an enormous development in the last couple of years; its components complement the modern day needs that have led to its emergence as an irreplaceable part of the industry, especially in those that deliver Internet of Things (IoT). Microservices come with an architectural style that structures an application as a collection of flexible services, which can then be individually implemented according to the business’s needs. The architecture promises a continuous delivery of large, complex applications; these flexible architectures enable organizations to evolve its technology stack over time.

Microservices are increasingly being preferred to create enterprise applications due to its distinct advantages. In today’s world where possibilities are immense and ever-evolving, one cannot sit back and relax after building a single platform. It has to evolve and be ready for future needs continuously. Microservices give ample options to be progressive—this includes flexible architecture, precision, and speed; it has such a structural advancement that other platforms seem obsolete in comparison.

Drawbacks of Older Systems

Situations such as mobile app development employ unintelligent sources that used to rely on manual human interference. The lack of expertise in systems such as those used to slow down the whole process. Given the apparent drawbacks of the obsolete systems and lucrative benefits of microservices, it seems that microservices are going to become an inevitable platform for the choice of architecture for developers, in the world of IoT, shortly.

Microservices have faced several criticisms for being inappropriate for certain DevOps cultures, but, they stand very feebly against the likely benefits of the microservices; this is exhibited through the broad adoption of microservices across numerous world-leading industries. Modern-day tech-giants and large-scale online services providers such as Amazon, Netflix, and Twitter have all moved forward from their old technology to microservices-driven architecture — this allows the companies to scale to their size, make predictions and form strategies on-the-go.

Fast and Progressive

Microservices enable the IoT deployment to be fluid and to ensure that the need of the hour is met with an appropriate resolution. The IoT infrastructure generally requires immediate decisions to tackle challenges for successful deployment. Microservices allow a system to operate independently where the entire technology stack need not be disturbed to test new ideas/products.

Massive Value

Due to its scope for multiple deployments, each operation can take numerous trials at once. Earlier alternatives did not provide us with such flexibility, and, therefore, the evolution process was much slower. Microservices allow upgrades in which each step results in fine-graining of the concerned product, helping us obtain the maximum value.

Increased Flexibility

One of the main highlights of microservices is the flexibility it extends to developers. We can leverage microservices for testing and retesting without having to disturb the whole mechanism. If the checked item isn’t working, we can perform substitutions with something better. In this way, microservices not only allow ready testing but also makes the evolution process flexible – the rectification of one branch does not disturb the whole tree of the process.

Cost-Effective

In this dynamic digital world, technology is always developing and becoming superseded by more sophisticated and cost-effective alternatives. One big advantage of having microservices in IoT is that they both can adapt to these dynamics. The microservices structures tackle obsoleteness by replacing outdated nodes and introducing net structures to fill the gaps – this makes the process fluid and cost-effective. By bypassing the unnecessary tasks, microservices allow one to test innovative ventures quickly – much needed for a progressive future.

Isolated Risk

Assembling a solution through microservices allows one to adjust and iterate; this can be done even without having to re-architect the entire system. Most mobile and web application developers find it beneficial to apply agile development, and older options did not allow this scope of isolating risks. The continuous microservices will enable one to move towards the finish line and connect all the APIs needed, one by one, without having to increase risk.

All of these perks come up as we deploy microservices. The dynamic future doesn’t tolerate obsoleteness nor does it want to slow down. Microservices allow unlimited customization and overall faster operation in their environments. The lower cost and risk reduction introduced by microservices is motivating many organizations to make the upgrade.

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Everything you need to Know about Serverless Microservices in AWS

Everything you need to Know about Serverless Microservices in AWS
It’s a well-known fact that handling multiple servers can be a painful experience, especially in the short run. Multiple servers mean multiple developers will need to work on the same code, making the code repository difficult to handle in the long run. One of the biggest disadvantages in the long run is the resiliency, which causes the whole back end to get bogged down, making the website crash and slow down eventually.

What are AWS Microservices?
The microservices architecture has been designed to solve all forms of front end and back end issues. The back end is wired to communicate with various small services through a network of HTTP or other messaging systems. Since the setup is rather elaborate, the whole procedure is time consuming and can take considerable time to setup. Post the setup formalities, a developer can benefit immensely by optimizing work through work parallelization and improved resiliency. Each developer can access and develop their own microservice, without worrying about code conflicts.

What does going Serverless mean?
The concept of going serverless is relatively new and has seen the day of light just recently. In an ideal situation, the traditional back end was deployed on a group of servers. Such an approach had its own set of advantages. It allowed the developers to control their own servers along with the infrastructure behind it. However, like everything else, it contributed a lot towards the cost, making it an inefficient solution for companies. Add a set of engineers to build, maintain and run the infrastructure, and your budget will increase manifold.

With the introduction of the serverless technology, all these problems can be solved considerably. You can make use of a service which will run your code, as well as take care of all your maintenance issues. What you do end up paying for is the time it usually takes to process each request thrown at the code. For this purpose, AWS offers the AWS Lambda service, which is somewhat similar to the functionality of Microsoft’s Azure Function and Google’s Cloud Functions.

What Services aid the Serverless Microservices?
Amazon API Gateway: API is a gateway service that offers the option to use a configurable REST API in the form of a service. You get to author your needs and create it in the form of a code. Say, for example, you decided what would happen if a particular HTTP Method is implemented and called on a certain HTTP Resource. In this case, say you want to execute and implement a Lambda function if the HTTP request comes through. API Gateway helps in mapping input and output data through a series of formats. Thankfully API Gateway is a fully fledged service, which is managed extensively, allowing you to pay for only what you use.

AWS Lambda Services: Being a pay as you go service, AWS Lambda is a well-managed service hub. It allows you to get rid of over provisioning costs, as well as avoid the need of any boot time, patching, as well as load balancing.

Amazon DynamoDB: Amazon DynamoDB is a document store wherein you can look up values through their key values multiple Availability Zones or data centers to bring about a subtle consistency. Like Lambda, it too is a 99% managed service, while the remaining 1% is free to perform reading and writing of code.

The Request Flow and how it Works with Microservices
In an ideal situation, it’s imperative to understand how the data flows through serverless microservices. The user’s HTTP hits the API Gateway; the API Gateway checks the HTTP request and figures if the request is valid or not. Through this approach, it makes multiple requests within the database and executes the business logic.

Another system which aids the processing of information within the serverless environment is the AWS CloudWatch. The AWS CloudWatch stores metrics in the form of numbers and text information in the form of logs. It also allows you to define your alarms over your metrics. At any given point of time, if your system begins to default, you can get an instant notification of the default using AWS SNS, making the process seamless and streamlined.

Summary
AWS Microservices are well balanced and fully managed, thereby allowing you to concentrate on performing multiple forms of other operational tasks. Through the concentration on other important tasks, the functionality of the code can be improved manifold, as it is performed through a series of automated tasks.

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microservices building an-effective business model with aws architecture

Microservices: Building an Effective Business Model with AWS Architecture

Microservices: Building an Effective Business Model with AWS Architecture

One buzz-word that has been spreading across the IT industry for the last few years is ‘Microservices’. However, these are not completely new approach to the IT infrastructure, but a combination of best proven methods of concepts such as nimble software development, service related architecture and API-first design (building the API first and developing the web application on top of that).

Microservices can be simply defined as ‘a self-contained process fulfilling a unique business capability’.

Following are some characteristics of a microservice architecture:

– Redistributed data management: Microservices don’t rely on a single schema in their central database. They have different views for various data models and are unique in the ways they are developed, deployed and managed.

– Functional independence: Modules in the microservice architecture can act independently without affecting the functionality of other components. They can be changed or upgraded without affecting other microservice modules.

– Simplicity: Each component is built on a set of capabilities fulfilling a specific function. Depending on the level of complexity, it can be split up into two or more independent components.

– Flexible and heterogeneous approach: Microservice gives the teams a freedom to choose the best tools and methods for their specific problems, be it programming languages, operating systems or data stores.

– Black box design: Microservice components potentially hide the details of their complexity from other components. The internal communication between the components happen with very well defined APIs to prevent implicit data dependencies.

– DevOps: This means, when you build it, you operate it. This helps the developers to be in close contact with their consumers, precisely understanding their needs and expectations.

Benefits and challenges of Microservices:

When addressing the agility and scalability issues of traditional monolithic architecture deployments, microservices benefit consumers in various ways such as:

Microservices create a sophisticated working environment where small and independent teams take the ownership of a particular service. Hence, empowering them to work quickly and independently shortening the cycle times.

Having a Devops culture by merging the development and operational skills removes the hassles and contradictions, providing an agile deploying environment. Making it easy to test and implement new ideas faster, henceforth creating a low cost of failure.

Dividing a software into small and well defined modules can be maintained, reused and composed easily, giving out a great output in-terms of quality and reliability.

Each service can be developed and implemented with their best-suitable programming languages and frameworks, and can be finely tuned in-line with aptly performing service configurations.

Failure isolation is made easier with microservices as techniques such as health-checking, caching or circuit breakers allow you to reduce the blast radius of a failing component.

Despite all these advantages we have discussed above, there are some disadvantages of these microservice approaches as diverse systems invite more complexity.

Determining the right boundaries for a microservice architecture is crucial when you migrate from a traditional monolithic architecture.

Versioning for a microservice architecture can be challenging.

Developing an effective team structure, transforming the organization to follow a devops approach and streamlining an effective communication between them can be challenging.

The more the number of microservice modules, the more is its complexity in interactions.

In a microservice approach, we no longer run a single service, but a combination from dozens to even hundreds of services. This increases operational complexity to a greater level.

AWS, one of the most-preferred cloud service platforms has number of offerings those address the challenges of a microservice architecture.

Effective Scaling and Provisioning of resources:

AWS microservice architecture employ on-demand resources that are readily available and provisioned when needed. Multiple environments can co-exist correspondingly, so that you need not employ difficult forecasting methods to guess the storage capacity of the microservices.

You only pay for what you use:

You can potentially experiment the new features or services, and roll them out if they aren’t successful for your business goals in AWS microservice architecture. This helps you find the innovation best suiting your business goals and also fulfills a microservice’s goal of achieving high agility.

Versatile programmability:

AWS microservices come with a specific API, Command Line Interface (CLI) and SDKs for different programming languages. Even complete architectures can be cloned, scaled and monitored through custom codes and programming languages. And, in-case of any failure, they are capable in healing themselves automatically.

AWS microservices provide you with a flexible environment to programmatically build custom tools and deploy the suitable resources, thereby reducing the operational costs and efforts.

Infrastructure as a Code:

AWS microservice architecture lets you to describe the whole infrastructure as a code and allows you to manage it in a version-control environment. You can redeploy any specific version of an infrastructure at any time, and compare the quality and performance to any application version to ensure they are in sync.

Reduce operational complexity with Continuous deployment and delivery:

Managing multiple application cycles in parallel can lead to operational complexity. AWS microservices offer automation of the provisioning and deployment process, enabling the adoption of continuous integration. This ‘continuous integration’ of the development part of the life-cycle can be further extended to the operations part of the life-cycle.

Managed services with AWS microservice architecture:

One of the key benefits of cloud infrastructures is it relieves you of the hassles of provisioning virtual servers, installing and configuring the softwares, and dealing with scaling and reliable backups. Monitoring, scaling and security are already built into the AWS microservices, helping you to further reduce the operational complexity of running microservice based architectures.

Service-oriented and Polyglot approach:

Each AWS microservice focuses on solving a specific and well-defined problem by communicating with other services using clearly defined APIs. This approach breaks down the complex infrastructure into simpler bricks or modules, preventing the need of duplication of the processes.

With microservices definitely helping to break down the complex business process into simpler modules, AWS cloud microservices further reduces the operational and interactional complexity of the microservices, helping you to define and use the most ‘appropriate’ solution for your specific business problem.

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The Difference between SOA and Microservices?

We’ve had a few articles over the years on the differences and similarities between SOA and microservices. Some suggest there is much to be learned from SOA whereas others believe that distancing microservices from SOA is more beneficial. Furthermore, Neal Ford, amongst others, has suggested that moving from monolithic architectures to a services-based approach may be easier than going to microservices. There has not been much activity recently around the overall “SOA or microservices” debate until RedMonk’s Stephen O’Grady published an article on the subject. In it O’Grady suggests that the size of the service is not the deciding factor, similar to what others have argued over the years, such as Dan North, and separately Jeppe Cramon stated:

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